Programs

Florida/Caribbean AIDS Education and Training Center (F/C AETC)

The F/C AETC is funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and led by Principal Investigator (PI), Julianne Serovich, PhD, Clinical Director, Jeffrey Beal, MD, and Director, Kimberly Molnar, MAcc. The F/C AETC works collaboratively with various universities across Florida and Puerto Rico to provide state-of-the-art information, training, and consultation on the treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS to clinicians in Florida, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands. The F/C AETC also has been funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to implement the CDC HIV Testing Initiative/Adolescent Project, a prevention program with the overall goal of ensuring that HIV testing becomes a part of regular routine health screenings.

Florida/Caribbean Telehealth Education Training Center (F/C TETC)
The F/C TETC program is funded by HRSA. This program is designed to expand access to care and improve outcomes for who are HIV-positive and patients residing in historically underserved communities. Through the use of telehealth technology2, The program aims to create expert providers in underserved communities to reduce the need to refer patients to out-of-town specialists. The F/C TETC program is led by PI Jeffrey Beal, MD, Medical Director Jennifer Janelle, MD, and Project Coordinator Debbie Cestaro-Seifer, MS, RN.

2 Expert faculty specialists in HIV/AIDS treatment and care provide ongoing training and education to increase internal capacity of community health care centers, medical clinics and offices to manage HIV infection and co-morbid conditions including, but not limited to hepatitis B and C, tuberculosis, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, depression, and dementia. Program faculty include internists, an infectious disease specialist, a psychiatrist, Pharm.Ds, a case manager and a nurse.

HIV in Primary Care Learning Community

This project, in partnership with the National Center for HIV Care in Minority Communities (NCHCMC), is intended to expand primary care capacity in Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) to include comprehensive, quality care for individuals living with HIV.

Funding targets training and technical assistance interventions at FQHCs in Florida, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The partner clinic sites engage in a robust and innovative curriculum based on case discussion learning that is delivered using telehealth technology twice a month. The bi-monthly interactive learning sessions are supported with ongoing clinical mentorship by program faculty between sessions The program aims to address critical components on the President’s National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) by reducing infections, increasing access, and reducing HIV-related health disparities.

Perinatal HIV Prevention Program 

The Perinatal HIV Prevention Program is funded by the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) and led by Project Coordinator Millie Leach, RN, BSN. The program focuses on the prevention of HIV transmission between mother and child. The Perinatal program distributes educational materials to healthcare providers throughout the region, as well as provides education and technical assistance on the implementation of rapid HIV testing in labor and delivery.

Prevention Programs

The University of South Florida (USF) Center for HIV Education and Research operates various HIV Prevention Programs funded by FDOH, HRSA, and CDC. The objectives of these programs are to educate providers on CDC’s recommendations for routine HIV testing of adults, adolescents, and pregnant women in all healthcare settings and on how to integrate HIV prevention initiatives for HIV-positive patients as part of routine care. The goals of these interventions are to increase the number of healthcare providers who include HIV testing as a routine part of general medical and prenatal care; offer treatment and care or appropriate referral for care and services; and offer prevention education to everyone, especially those at increased risk of HIV infection.

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